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Cyber Crime Has Shifted It Trend In The Year 2017: Stated By IBM’s X-Force Threat Intelligence

IBM’s X-Force Threat Intelligence Index as each year have submitted their 2017 report this year. Where according to the report. Aside from the 4 billion records last year there were also 10,000 vulnerabilities found in software alone. As a result last year was the first year to have the highest rate of cyber crime. That was documented by IBM over the course of 20 years.

According to IBM last year a lot of different cyber crimes saw a rise in numbers. Where spam messages were on the top with a 400% increase in spam messages alone. Around 44% among the 400% spam messages were regarding malicious attachments. Which were based on ransom ware. Aside from that around 85% of these spam message attachments were in the malware category. That ended up locking down a lot of computers. Where its users were asked to pay ransom for the decryption of their computer.

IBM’s X-Force Threat Intelligence also indicated that cyber crime have now seen a change in trend. In the past cyber crime which mostly paid attention on unstructured data. Which included things like information, credit card data, passwords and personal health information. Now the trend has shifted to getting hands on gigabytes of data regarding archived emails, documents and source codes. Where we saw a lot of personal data being exposed to the general public.

IBM’s Vice President Caleb Barlow said “Cyber-criminals continued to innovate in 2016 as we saw techniques like ransom ware move from a nuisance to an epidemic. While the volume of records compromised last year researched historic highs, we see this shift to unstructured data as a seminal moment’’.

According to IBM’s X-Force Threat Intelligence financial and government sectors are the top priority of cyber crime. Where the government sector saw a breach of 398 million records. Where we are expected to see further rise in the advancement of cyber crime down the line.

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